tourism

Discovering the Canary Islands on a bicycle

One of the exciting ways to experience the diverse scenic beauty of the Canary Islands is by bicycle.

Magnificent landscapes, a consistently warm climate and plenty of sunshine: the Canary Islands inspire wanderlust in holidaymakers all over the world. One of the best ways to experience the diverse scenic beauty of the islands is by bike. Whether it’s relaxed cruising or climbing peaks on a challenging mountain tour – the Canary Islands offer the right route for every level.


GRAN CANARIA: UP THE PICO DE LAS NIEVES

One of the most beautiful bike routes on Gran Canaria leads to the second highest mountain on the island, the Pico de las Nieves. The starting point is 355 metres above sea level in the village of Ingenio. This is where the two roads GC-120 and GC-122 cross, both of which lead up the mountain. Once at the top, an impressive view awaits the cyclists: the trade winds constantly drive clouds against the mountain slopes, where they break like waves on the coast. The natural spectacle not only has a hypnotic effect on the observer, but also once gave the peak its poetic name.

TENERIFE: THROUGH THE TEIDE NATIONAL PARK

The famous Teide National Park on Tenerife offers cyclists the opportunity to experience the beauty of nature in the truest sense of the word. Various routes lead through the area, which can be selected depending on the level of difficulty and distance. On each route, holidaymakers enjoy breathtaking views of the Teide volcano, Spain’s highest mountain, and the surrounding landscape, which is characterised by lava fields, rocks and rock formations.

LANZAROTE: ROUND TRIP FROM PUERTO DEL CARMEN

A challenging route for all experienced bikers can be found on Lanzarote: the route begins and ends in Puerto del Carmen and leads through the valley of El Golfo and the coastal village of La Santa, among other places. In addition to the total of 180 kilometres, the 2,130 metres of altitude that have to be climbed along the way make the tour a real challenge. A highlight on the route is the Timanfaya National Park.

The moon-like landscape is so extraordinary that it is used, among others, by the European Space Agency as a training site to prepare for future journeys to Mars. The spectacular natural landscape with volcanoes and lava fields extends over 5,000 hectares and offers impressions as if from another world.

FUERTEVENTURA: FROM CORRALEJO TO MORRO JABLE

This route leads from Corralejo in the far north of Fuerteventura to Morro Jable in the south. Along the way, travellers pass one of the Canary Islands’ most beautiful natural treasures: Cofete beach on the Jandia peninsula is one of the largest and wildest stretches of coastline on the island, enticing visitors with twelve kilometres of fine sand and crystal-clear water. Moreover, there are no houses or asphalted roads here. Just a stone’s throw away, there is also a rewarding lookout point from which holidaymakers can enjoy an incomparable view of the surrounding area.

LA GOMERA: FROM SAN SEBASTIAN DE LA GOMERA TO THE ALTO DE GARAJONAY

It takes around four hours to cycle from San Sebastian de La Gomera, the capital of the island of the same name, to the Alto de Garajonay, which at 1,300 metres is the highest point in the surrounding national park and on the entire island. The intense and winding route leads through impressive laurel forests, officially a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

EL HIERRO: FROM EL SABINAR TO FARO DE ORCHILLA

On El Hierro, cyclists ride best when they simply let themselves be driven by the wind and the seemingly endless curves. One of the most beautiful tours runs from the juniper forest El Sabinar, whose trees have taken on bizarre shapes due to the permanent fall winds, to the lighthouse Faro de Orchilla, also known as the lighthouse at the end of the world and marking one of the most remote places on the island. Along the way, the route passes various viewpoints such as the Mirador de la Peña, designed by the famous artist César Manrique.

LA PALMA: FROM TAZACORTE TO BERLOVENTO

The last route on this list goes from coast to coast – more precisely from Tazacorte in the west of La Palma to Berlovento in the north. Among other things, the route winds through the prehistoric Caldera de Taburiente, a primeval volcanic crater that is one of the most impressive nature reserves on the archipelago. From sea level, the route climbs to an altitude of 2,426 metres – that’s the height of Roque de los Muchachos, the highest point on the island.


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